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  Web http://www.klippert.com



  Wednesday, April 15, 2009 – Permalink –

Date an Octothorpe

Date an Octothorpe


Some more of those things I'm sure I used to know

The keyboard combination of Alt+Shift+D inserts the current date in MS Word and PowerPoint. Ctrl+; (semicolon) does it in Excel and Access.

If you do not like the date's format, select a different one with Insert>Date and Time and, if you would like to make that permanent, click on the Default button in the lower left corner of the dialog box (in PowerPoint it's in the lower right corner).

In Excel, Ctrl+Shift +# formats the entry as day-month-year. Ctrl+1 will display the "Format cells" dialog box.

BTW, the "hash, pound or number" sign # is also called an "octothorpe".

The person who named it combined Octo for the eight points and Thorpe for James Thorpe.

"Bell Labs engineer, Don Macpherson, went to instruct their first client, the Mayo Clinic, in the use of the new (touch tone phone system). He felt the need for a fresh and unambiguous name for the # symbol. His reasoning that led to the new word was roughly that it had eight points, so ought to start with octo-. He was apparently at that time active in a group that was trying to get the Olympic medals of the athlete Jim Thorpe returned from Sweden, so he decided to add thorpe to the end."

While we're at it, the "backwards P, Enter mark" is actually named a "pilcrow".

The pilcrow was used in medieval times to mark a new train of thought, before the convention of using paragraphs was commonplace.

Also see:
Geek-speak names for punctuation marks

Wikipedia:
Punctuation



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<Doug Klippert@ 3:35 AM

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  Friday, June 27, 2008 – Permalink –

Avoid AutoComplete Errors

Don't start


When you type an entry in a ComboBox control Access will attempt to complete the entry based on the control's lookup list. This is controlled by the AutoExpand property, which is set to "Yes" by default.

If your value list contains several items that are close in spelling, it is easy for users to let Access choose the wrong item by accident.

You can avoid errors by setting the control's AutoExpand property to "No" in Design view.

Once the change has been made, users will be forced to type the entire entry or select an item using the ComboBox control's dropdown list.



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<Doug Klippert@ 5:44 AM

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  Sunday, April 13, 2008 – Permalink –

Canada/US Postal Codes

Automatic Input masks



If you have a mix of Canadian and US postal codes, you might play with the following code inserted as a Country control "After Update" Event property.

Private Sub Country_AfterUpdate()
Dim strCountry As String
strCountry = Me.Country

Select Case strCountry
Case "Canada"
Me.[PostalCode].InputMask = ">L0L\ 0L0;;_"
Case "USA"
Me.[PostalCode].InputMask = "00000-9999;;_"
Case Else
'If the country is not Canada or USA no input mask will be used
Me.[PostalCode].InputMask = ""
End Select
End Sub


comp.databases.ms-access forum

Working with postal codes in Access

As a rule, if you won't be performing numeric calculations on the data, entries should be stored as text. Social Security numbers, Phone numbers and postal codes should be stored as text.


You can use alphabetic characters in an input mask. For example, one of the sample input masks is >L0L\ 0L0 used to represent a Canadian postal code.

The ">" character in the input mask converts all the characters that follow to uppercase.

The "L" character requires an alpha entry; the "0" (zero) requires a numeric entry.

A "\"character causes the following character to be displayed as a literal character rather than a mask character.

A space appears between the three character pairs.
For example, V5P 2G1 is one valid postal code that the user could enter. The mask would prevent the user from entering two sequential alphabetic characters or numbers.

See:

Trinity University - San Antonio, Texas:
Input mask

Definition characters used to create an input mask
Some validation rules

You can manipulate postal codes in Access by changing the data type, input mask, or format of a postal code field.

Microsoft KB 207829:
ACC2000: How to Manipulate ZIP Codes in Microsoft Access.

Also see:
Postal Codes



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<Doug Klippert@ 5:57 AM

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  Thursday, January 17, 2008 – Permalink –

What the ####

Truncated Numbers


Access has a new option that will show octothorps when the column is too narrow to display the entire value. When this option is not enabled, you see only part of the values in a column rather than ####.

You'll find the selection under Access Options when you click the Office button.
Go to Current Database and make your choice.






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<Doug Klippert@ 6:12 AM

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  Saturday, August 25, 2007 – Permalink –

Zoom Box

Better view


Access does not provide much room to enter long expressions in queries, forms, or reports.
You can drag the column wider, but there is a neater, quicker method.


With the insertion point in the field, hit: SHIFT+F2.
A Zoom box opens. Enter the formula and hit OK.


New Folders


BTW: If you enter Field names in the Zoom box without square brackets. If the fields are recognized, Access will add the brackets.



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<Doug Klippert@ 7:48 AM

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  Saturday, June 02, 2007 – Permalink –

Zeros - Before and After

Nothing's a problem



"When you import data into Microsoft Access, trailing zeros may be lost. This will happen when you import data that is formatted to show these zeros, but where the zeros are not actually part of the data.

For example, in a Microsoft Excel workbook, you can format the number 1234 so that it will be displayed as 1234.000. When you import this workbook into a Microsoft Access table, the number will be displayed as 1234.

This article shows you how to preserve trailing zeros when you import data into Microsoft Access."



How to Preserve Trailing Zeros When Importing Data

Also:
Word — Decimal Point or Trailing Zeros Missing When You Merge Microsoft Access Database


Excel — Using a Custom Number Format to Display Leading Zeros


Zero Padding Numeric Strings


Add leading zeros to numeric strings in Access



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<Doug Klippert@ 7:23 AM

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  Monday, February 19, 2007 – Permalink –

New Line in Memo

Labels and Text boxes


When you're using a form to enter text in a memo field, pressing [Enter] within the text inserts a line break.

However, when you're working with a memo in a table's Datasheet view, pressing [Enter] moves the focus to the next field.

You can force line breaks when you're entering text by pressing [Ctrl][Enter]. This technique also works with text fields and can be applied when you're entering text in labels or text boxes on a form.

To permanently configure a text box so that pressing [Enter] inserts a new line, set its EnterKeyBehavior property equal to New Line In Field.



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<Doug Klippert@ 6:10 AM

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