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  Web http://www.klippert.com



  Thursday, November 19, 2009 – Permalink –

Control Access Text Alignment

Distribute Text Evenly Within Controls


When you add form or report controls, the Text Align property defaults to General setting: characters align to the left while numbers and dates align to the right.

When you set up controls to act as headings or titles, you can achieve interesting visual results by changing the Text Align setting to Distribute (This is called Justify in Word).

This setting distributes characters within the control evenly to span its entire width.

If you apply this setting to a textbox control, the alignment switches to Left alignment when you click inside the control to allow for easy data entry.
General (Default)
The text aligns to the left; numbers and dates align to the right.
Left
The text, numbers, and dates align to the left.
Center
The text, numbers, and dates are centered.
Right
The text, numbers, and dates align to the right.
Distribute
The text, numbers, and dates are evenly distributed.




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<Doug Klippert@ 3:31 AM

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  Monday, March 09, 2009 – Permalink –

Change Properties in Form View

Alterations on the run


As you work with a form, you will, sometimes, find controls would benefit from minor tweaking. You may want to change the color of a text box, change the font that's used, or remove scroll bars.

You may have been told switch to Design view to make changes. However, you can display the property sheets for a control while you're in Form view.

To do so, click the Properties on the View menu, Right-click, or press [Alt][Enter].
As in Design view, the displayed properties relate to the control that is selected on the form. The property changes you make are reflected on the fly.
You will be prompted to resave your form when you close it.




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<Doug Klippert@ 3:49 AM

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  Friday, November 07, 2008 – Permalink –

Null, Nothing, Nada

Empty entries


"An example might be fax numbers in a customer database. If you store a Null, it means you don't know whether the customer has a fax number.

If you store a zero-length string, you know the customer has no fax number.
Access gives you the flexibility to deal with both types of 'empty' values."


Nulls and Zero-Length Strings

From John L. Viescas at Viescas.com


Also:
Make Null Zero



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<Doug Klippert@ 4:10 AM

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  Friday, October 10, 2008 – Permalink –

Hidden Passwords

Format to mask entry



You can easily set up a text box to mask entries with asterisks, allowing you to hide entries like passwords from prying eyes.

To do so, in Design view, display the properties for the text box and change the Input Mask property to Password.

Passwords can then be displayed as ******

Also see:

Microsoft-AccessSolutions.co.uk:

Add Simple Security

How to create a User Login Form in Microsoft Access



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<Doug Klippert@ 3:23 AM

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  Thursday, March 27, 2008 – Permalink –

Entry Checker

A second chance


Unlike Word or Excel, Access does not warn you when data is changed.
Unless you make a structural or code change, Access thinks you know what you want to know and allows you to enter or change data and the close the application without a squeak.

There is a way around this:


"In Microsoft Office Access 2007, by default, users are not prompted to confirm changes after modifying and saving records on a form. But often you might want to prompt users to confirm their changes before the record is saved.

You can use a BeforeUpdate event procedure to display a confirmation prompt and handle a user's response to either cancel or continue with the save.

This visual how-to topic illustrates how to display a custom dialog box to prompt users to cancel or continue with saving changes to a record.

User Prompts
(with a video)



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<Doug Klippert@ 7:33 AM

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  Friday, August 10, 2007 – Permalink –

Hardcopy Relationships

Document database


When you're documenting your database applications, you may want to include the same visual diagram of your table relationships that's available through the Relationships window.

In Access 2000 thru 2003, this is easy. Simply display the Relationships window as usual and then choose File>Print Relationships from the menu bar. Doing so displays a report preview that you can then print or save.


In 2007, to just print out a report, find Database tools on the Ribbon and click on Database Documenter.


Relationships are at the bottom of the All Object Types tab





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<Doug Klippert@ 6:32 AM

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  Tuesday, July 17, 2007 – Permalink –

Flag Access Controls

Tag Property


The TAG property allows you to associate up to 2,084 characters of text with any form, report, section, or control. This is especially helpful when you want to single out a specific subset of controls.

For instance, say that you want to hide certain controls on a form when a user clicks a button.
You can flag which controls will be hidden by entering the word "Hide" (or any other consistent word) in each control's Tag property. Then, attach the following code to the command button's Click event procedure:
Dim ctl As Control
For Each ctl In Me.Controls
If ctl.Tag = "Hide" Then
ctl.Visible = False
End If
Next





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<Doug Klippert@ 6:42 AM

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  Monday, April 16, 2007 – Permalink –

Time Interval

Run code at timed intervals


You may occasionally want to run a procedure associated with a form at set intervals. To do so, add the code to the form's Timer event procedure. Then, set the form's TimerInterval property to the number of milliseconds that should elapse between each time the code is run. The maximum you can set is 65,535.
(in Access 2007, the TimerInterval property setting is a Long Integer value between 0 and 2,147,483,647.)


Keep in mind that you shouldn't use a very small TimerInterval, otherwise your application will likely suffer a performance hit. To prevent the Timer event from firing, set the TimerInterval to 0.


Also see:
HOW TO: Create a Stopwatch Form in Access



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<Doug Klippert@ 6:10 AM

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  Monday, February 19, 2007 – Permalink –

New Line in Memo

Labels and Text boxes


When you're using a form to enter text in a memo field, pressing [Enter] within the text inserts a line break.

However, when you're working with a memo in a table's Datasheet view, pressing [Enter] moves the focus to the next field.

You can force line breaks when you're entering text by pressing [Ctrl][Enter]. This technique also works with text fields and can be applied when you're entering text in labels or text boxes on a form.

To permanently configure a text box so that pressing [Enter] inserts a new line, set its EnterKeyBehavior property equal to New Line In Field.



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<Doug Klippert@ 6:10 AM

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  Saturday, February 03, 2007 – Permalink –

Properties Report

Record of Records



If you would like a report that includes all of the properties, relationships and permissions of the objects in your database, go to Tools>Analyze and choose Documenter...

Access will create a VERY detailed report.

Access Documentation


Ezy Documenter was recommended by Woody Leonard's Access Watch.



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<Doug Klippert@ 7:14 AM

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