Book

Suggestions


Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner



Use your pdf converter to make your pdf files easy! You can now buy software that makes converting pdf to doc possible! Did you know you can even convert pdf to word?
Home Page

Bloglines

1906
CelebrateStadium
2006


OfficeZealot

Scobleizer

TechRepublic

AskWoody

SpyJournal












Subscribe here
Add to 

My Yahoo!
This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Host your Web site with PureHost!


eXTReMe Tracker
  Web http://www.klippert.com



  Friday, April 10, 2009 – Permalink –

Business Rules!!! ... Rules

Bean Counting Models


Data modeling can be an exhausting, time consuming process. Here are some samples that may establish a starting point.


The website has close to 100 database models for experimentation, practice and examples.

"My intention is to provide a wide range of 'Kick Start' Models that anyone can use as a starting-point, and could extend cleanly and logically, with appropriate reference to the Business Rules.

It is not my intention to provide Models that can be used off-the-shelf to meet the requirements of a large commercial organization.

After all, that is one of the things I do for a living !!!

None of the Models is the complete and final solution in its area, but any of them can be added to easily and quickly to meet a specific requirement. The logic in each Model is intended to be correct and to contain the minimum Entities for the area being modeled."


Database Answers

Barry Williams - Founder and Principal Consultant.


If you're attempting a "Big Year" list of blogs, you can add Viewpoint of a Database Analyst: A Database Design Principles Blog




See all Topics

Labels: , ,


<Doug Klippert@ 3:49 AM

Comments: Post a Comment


  Thursday, April 02, 2009 – Permalink –

Relationships

How it all ties together



"Find out how to reap the benefits of data normalization in Access while ensuring that your system provides users with all the information they need. Learn to relate your application's tables to each other, so that your users can view the data in the system as a single entity. After you define relationships between tables, you can build queries, forms, reports, and data access pages that combine information from multiple tables."


Relationships: Your Key to Data Integrity in Access 2003

An article from Informit.com and Alison Balter.

Alison is the founder of InfoTechnology Partners, Inc., a computer consulting firm in California. She is a highly experienced trainer and consultant, specializing in Windows applications.





See all Topics

Labels:


<Doug Klippert@ 3:27 AM

Comments: Post a Comment


  Friday, February 13, 2009 – Permalink –

Data Modeling

Data bits and pieces

While a few of us may be guilty of constructing databases on the run, and then trying to clean up the mess later, the wise ones plan ahead.

What information will you need in the future? What reports are going to be requested? If you're the bean counter, do you need to count all the legumes?


"Data modeling is probably the most labor intensive and time consuming part of the development process. Why bother especially if you are pressed for time? A common response by practitioners who write on the subject is that you should no more build a database without a model than you should build a house without blueprints.

The goal of the data model is to make sure that the all data objects required by the database are completely and accurately represented. Because the data model uses easily understood notations and natural language, it can be reviewed and verified as correct by the end-users.

The data model is also detailed enough to be used by the database developers to use as a "blueprint" for building the physical database. The information contained in the data model will be used to define the relational tables, primary and foreign keys, stored procedures, and triggers. A poorly designed database will require more time in the long-term. Without careful planning you may create a database that omits data required to create critical reports, produces results that are incorrect or inconsistent, and is unable to accommodate changes in the user's requirements."

University of Texas at Austin
Introduction to Data Modeling

Finding the Perfect Fit
By Tim McLellan

AgileData.org:
Data Modeling 101

DataModel.org




See all Topics

Labels: , , ,


<Doug Klippert@ 3:47 AM

Comments: Post a Comment


  Tuesday, June 10, 2008 – Permalink –

Auto Link

Outlook Contacts in Access


Automatically set up links to data outside of Access.
It still works in Access/Outlook '07.

Try this:

  1. Choose File >Open from the menu bar.
    (Office button>Open in 2007)
  2. Under Files Of Type choose Outlook().
  3. Locate your Outlook PST files.
  4. Choose Contacts, or if you have set up separate files for different groups choose an appropriate one.
  5. The wizard walks you through the process of creating an Access database with a linked Contact table.




The changes made in Access will be reflected in Outlook and vice versa.

If you want to create a new database that will link to other data that isn't in an Access format, you can do it quickly.

The classic way is to use the File>Get External Data >Link Tables method.

However you can simply choose File >Open from the menu bar.

Select the appropriate data format from the Files Of Type dropdown list
(such as Microsoft Excel (*.xls)).

Open the file and Access will automatically create an MDB file with the same name as the data source you selected and will set up links to the data.

From there you can develop forms, queries and reports.



See all Topics

Labels: , ,


<Doug Klippert@ 7:46 AM

Comments: Post a Comment


  Saturday, March 01, 2008 – Permalink –

OLAP Cubes

More dimensions than Star trek


When a company accumulates a great deal of information, it becomes un-wieldy to work with just basic Excel or Access databases.


There is a database concept called on OLAP cube (On-Line Analytical Processing).


This multidimensional collection of data can be thought of as a 3-D pivot table viewed from flat land.


MSDN:
Just What Are Cubes Anyway?
(A Painless Introduction to OLAP Technology)

OLAPReort.com:
What is OLAP


Wikipedia:
OLAP

Wang.se (Wang Sweden) a Swedish software company:

Create an OLAP Cube



See all Topics

Labels: , ,


<Doug Klippert@ 7:08 AM

Comments: Post a Comment


  Friday, January 26, 2007 – Permalink –

Define Relationships by Keyboard

It's not a drag


If you've played with Access, you know that you can create relationships by dragging fields from one table to another.

There is another way to do it using just the keyboard.

I don't know why you would do it this way, but let's assume you lent your mouse to your brother-in-law for the week-end. (?)


  1. Close any open tables.

  2. Use F11 to switch to the Database window.

  3. Press ALT+T to select the Tools menu, and then press R to open the Relationships window.

  4. If the Show Table dialog box does not appear, press ALT+R to select the Relationships menu, and then press T to open the Show Table dialog box.

  5. In the Show Table dialog box, select the first table that you want to relate, and then press ENTER to add it to the Relationships window.

  6. Repeat step 5 for any other tables you want to relate, and then press ALT+C to close the Show Table dialog box.

  7. Press ALT+R to select the Relationships menu, and then press R to open the Edit Relationships dialog box.

  8. Press ALT+N to open the Create New dialog box.

  9. In the Left Table Name box, select the name of the table that contains the primary key.

  10. In the Right Table Name box, select the name of the table that contains the foreign key.

  11. In the Left Column Name box, select the primary key field, and in the Right Column Name box, select the foreign key field.

  12. Press ENTER.

  13. In the Edit Relationships dialog box, use the arrow keys to make sure that the two columns contain the field names you want.

  14. Press ALT+C to create the relationship.

MSDN.Microsoft.com:
Define relationships by using the keyboard



See all Topics

Labels:


<Doug Klippert@ 5:44 AM

Comments: Post a Comment