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  Wednesday, December 09, 2009 – Permalink –

Sparklines

Quick graphic reinforcement


A graph or chart can give the reader a visual representation of a great deal of data. Concepts or results can be more easily grasped by a well formatted graphic.

Charts, usually, take up more space in a document than is absolutely required.

Edward Tufte has come up with the concept of Sparklines (Sparklines:Intense, Word-sized Graphics)
.
These are small graphs about the same height and width as common words. They are not out of place in the text of a document.

Sparklines give the reader a snapshot of the data that quickly supports the material being discussed.



See:
Bisantz Sparklines

The Sparkmaker can create Sparklines for Word, Excel, or PowerPoint. They can also be produced in HTML.




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<Doug Klippert@ 3:28 AM

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  Wednesday, May 06, 2009 – Permalink –

Who was that font I saw you with last night?

That was no font, that was my typeface


You can find the Fonts supplied with some Microsoft products
Select a product name from the list to get a list of fonts supplied with that product.

Microsoft's Typography is an interesting site to poke around in.

Here are some books I use for reference material:

Words into Type

by Marjorie E. Skillin, Robert Malcolm Gay ISBN 0139642625


Stop Stealing Sheep & Find Out How Type Works


by Erik Spiekermann, E.M Ginger ISBN 0201703394


The Elements of Typographic Style

by Robert Bringhurst ISBN 0881791326

A font can be defined as a collection of characters with the same style and size. A typeface is the design of the characters regardless of size or style. The terms are used interchangeably today.



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<Doug Klippert@ 3:12 AM

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  Wednesday, April 15, 2009 – Permalink –

Date an Octothorpe

Date an Octothorpe


Some more of those things I'm sure I used to know

The keyboard combination of Alt+Shift+D inserts the current date in MS Word and PowerPoint. Ctrl+; (semicolon) does it in Excel and Access.

If you do not like the date's format, select a different one with Insert>Date and Time and, if you would like to make that permanent, click on the Default button in the lower left corner of the dialog box (in PowerPoint it's in the lower right corner).

In Excel, Ctrl+Shift +# formats the entry as day-month-year. Ctrl+1 will display the "Format cells" dialog box.

BTW, the "hash, pound or number" sign # is also called an "octothorpe".

The person who named it combined Octo for the eight points and Thorpe for James Thorpe.

"Bell Labs engineer, Don Macpherson, went to instruct their first client, the Mayo Clinic, in the use of the new (touch tone phone system). He felt the need for a fresh and unambiguous name for the # symbol. His reasoning that led to the new word was roughly that it had eight points, so ought to start with octo-. He was apparently at that time active in a group that was trying to get the Olympic medals of the athlete Jim Thorpe returned from Sweden, so he decided to add thorpe to the end."

While we're at it, the "backwards P, Enter mark" ΒΆ is actually named a "pilcrow".

The pilcrow was used in medieval times to mark a new train of thought, before the convention of using paragraphs was commonplace.

Also see:
Geek-speak names for punctuation marks

Wikipedia:
Punctuation




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<Doug Klippert@ 3:37 AM

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  Thursday, October 23, 2008 – Permalink –

Alternate Bullets

High caliber


There are other images that can be used as bullets in Word, PowerPoint, and HTML.
Allan Wyatt's Word Tips:

Using Words as Bullets


Netmechanic.com:

Make Custom Bullets
Using CSS


Shauna Kelly:

How to control bullets in Microsoft Word

Ins and outs of bullets and numbering in Word


Dubbo College :
(an easy five hours drive from Sydney, four hours from Newcastle and a ten hour drive from Melbourne and Brisbane.)



Paragraph Bullets


Troubleshooting Bullets and numbering


Also see:
Beyond Bullets.com

Beyond Bullet Points, the book



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<Doug Klippert@ 2:22 AM

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  Monday, August 04, 2008 – Permalink –

Typography for the rest of us

Real world fonts


Choosing a type face can be fun, but also overwhelming.

You want to convey the message without obscuring the thoughts in an avalanche of weird shapes.

Cameron Moll has a web site/Blog called Authentic Boredom; his "platitudinous web home."

Recently he explored:

The non-typographer's guide to practical typeface selection

"I honestly believe typeface selection is one of the most transparent ways of detecting good - and bad - design. You can tell plenty about a designer merely by the typefaces he/she chooses. So you'd be wise to start with trusted faces, and you'd be even wiser to know something about the history of each typeface."


Also see:
Who was that font I saw you with last night?



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<Doug Klippert@ 7:17 AM

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  Monday, February 11, 2008 – Permalink –

PPT Font Size

How big should you go?


In the old days of slide shows, presenters would hold their slides out at arm's length. If they could still see the text, then it would be OK when projected.

Dave Paradi has researched the question and offers a PDF document that compares screen size, fonts, and seating distance.

For instance:


"For example, if you're using a 60 inch screen and have 32 point text on your slides, the furthest someone should be is 57 feet from the screen."


Font Size

Dave Paradi's PowerPoint Tip



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<Doug Klippert@ 7:57 AM

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  Sunday, January 20, 2008 – Permalink –

Replace Fonts

A type change



PowerPoint has a feature that allows you to replace any of the fonts being used in a presentation
You may want to do this to change the look of a show, or because the type face is not available on another machine and not embeddable.
Go to Format>Replace Fonts.

Choose one of the fonts you are currently using and its replacement.

Look over your presentation before saving it. Sometimes a different font will change the spacing on a slide. You may have to reformat a few slides

RDP Slides.com:
Troubleshoot font problems

Informit.com:
Working with Text in PowerPoint

MS Office Assistance:
Why won't Replace Fonts work?
Understanding Unicode fonts



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<Doug Klippert@ 6:45 AM

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  Thursday, July 12, 2007 – Permalink –

Free Commercial Fonts

Good for non-commercial purposes



"Here you'll find one of the most unique archives out there for free fonts. We not only scoured the corners of the earth in search of famous fonts, but also helped create them! Explore around and download to your heart's delight! We have a vast selection from Willy Wonka to Honda to Pizza Hut. All fonts are free to download for any non-commercial purpose. Enjoy the fonts!"


SharkShock.com



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<Doug Klippert@ 7:16 AM

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  Sunday, June 03, 2007 – Permalink –

Slashed Zero

Oh!

ø

There is a discussion of the slashed zero at:
How to Insert a Slashed Zero (0 Overlaid with a /) - 211315

You can also download the Monaco font that has a slashed ø
(Monaco is an embeddable font)

Andale.ttf (Mono) has a dotted 0

Seagullscientific.com has a font called Crystal

Windows has a free font editor. Type eudcedit on the Start>Run line.
Vic Laurie has a description of the Private Character Editor- Eudcedit

You could also use the EQ field to create a strike through and assign it to an AutoCorrect entry.

{EQ \o (0,/)}

The easiest is, probably Alt+0216 or Alt+0248 It's a Latin "oh" with stroke, but it looks close.

The HTML character code is &oslash; ø



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<Doug Klippert@ 7:09 AM

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  Wednesday, January 24, 2007 – Permalink –

Font Properties Plus

Everything you need to know


To embed a font in a document or slide show so it can be displayed on any other machine, the font must support that action. The standard Windows properties statement does not show all the needed information.

The bottom of this illustration shows the standard information shown when you right-click a font file, and choose properties. The two views at the top are what appear when the Microsoft Font properties extension is installed.



Font Properties

If you right click on a font file in Windows its basic properties are displayed. The Font properties extension adds several new property tabs to this properties dialog box. These include information relating to font origination and copyright, the type sizes to which hinting and smoothing are applied, and the code pages supported by extended character sets.

It also will tell you if the font can be embeddedand/or edited in a document.




Protected

The font may not be embedded, copied, or modified. If you use a protected font in a document and if the document is opened on a computer that does not have the font installed on it, a font substitution occurs. Word substitutes the closest font available on the computer for the missing protected font.

Print/Preview

The font is embedded and temporarily loaded on the target computer. Documents that contain print/preview fonts must be opened read-only, and no edits are stored in the document. Embedding a font of this nature has the least impact on file size increase.

Editable

The font behaves just like the print/preview fonts, except that you may also apply the font to other text in the same document.

Installable

The font is installed on the target computer permanently when you open the document. This allows you to use the new fonts as if you installed the fonts directly into Windows yourself. This type of embedded font has the greatest impact on file size because the entire font or fonts are included with the document.



Versionand Features tabs
The Version tab includes version and date information. The Features tab describes the font in terms of number of glyphs, number of kerning pairs, the possible existence of a euro symbol and the presence of embedded bitmaps within the font.

Linkstab
If a font doesn't include a Web site URL, but does include a 'vendor ID code' a link will be provided to Microsoft's font vendor database.

The latest version is 2.3 as of December, 2006.
Font properties extension, version 2.3




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<Doug Klippert@ 4:44 AM

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