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  Friday, July 18, 2008 – Permalink –

Signing Macros

Security levels


There are three levels of Macro security:

High:
A computer user can open without a prompt a digitally signed project from a trusted publisher. Otherwise, the application blocks opening signed projects from untrusted publishers as well as unsigned projects.
Medium:
A computer user can open without a prompt a digitally signed project from a trusted publisher. In addition, you can also designate the publisher of a signed project as trusted so their projects will open without a prompt in the future. Unsigned projects are always prompted with a reminder that the file may contain potentially harmful code, but users can elect to open them anyway.
Low:
A computer user can open an unsigned project without a prompt. When users make a Low security setting, they're reminded that they aren't protected from potentially unsafe macros.
Securing Access Databases
"If you've used Access 2003, you've probably seen several security warning messages - Access 2003 cares about your security. An important part of Access 2003 security is digitally signing your code. As Rick Dobson shows, you can do it, but preparing for digital signing is critical.

A digital signature acts like shrink-wrap on your project: Clients know that they're getting a copy directly from you that no one else modified. Clients will also know that they're working with "your" code and not any version of it modified by a third party. As computing moves forward into a "security conscious" era, learning how to acquire and use a digital certificate is also important for interfacing with organizations that adopt policies of only running digitally signed Access 2003 projects: Your users may refuse to accept software from you that isn't shrink-wrapped."

Also:
Signing Access 2003 Projects

Other links:

How to make sure that your Office document has a valid digital signature in 2007 Office products and in Office 2003

Also:
HAL-PC MS Office & Excel SIG in Houston, Texas:
Digital Certificates and Trusted Sources for running Excel Macros under High Macro Security



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<Doug Klippert@ 5:02 AM

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  Sunday, May 20, 2007 – Permalink –

Secret Slide Numbers

PPT does not forget




"PowerPoint numbers slides in several ways and it pays to know the difference.

When you create a new slide, it gets a unique SlideID, a unique number that's read-only… you can't change it manually or programmatically. Reordering the slides won't cause it to change. Once a slide is created, it keeps the same SlideID forever.

SlideIndex is the ordinal number of the slide in the presentation as it's currently arranged. Move a slide around in slide sorter and its SlideIndex changes to reflect its new position in the show."

Slide number, SlideID, SlideIndex and all that jazz

From the MS Knowledgebase:
Sample Code to Print Slide Numbers for a Custom Show


"Microsoft PowerPoint has the ability to create custom slide shows, which are subsets of existing slides within your presentation. When you print a custom show, PowerPoint prints the page number defined for that slide. For example, if you print a custom show named My Show that consists of slides 2, 8, and 13 of your presentation, the numbers 2, 8, and 13 appear on the printed output.

This article provides a sample Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications macro that prints out a specified custom show and numbers the pages consecutively, beginning with the number 1."

Also:
Working with Slide Objects
and

Microsoft PowerPoint Objects



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<Doug Klippert@ 7:39 AM

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  Saturday, March 31, 2007 – Permalink –

Comment Code

Edit toolbar



You'll many times want to change blocks of code to comments in VBA modules; temporarily convert a block of VBA code to comments so that it's ignored during a trial run. Inserting an apostrophe before each line of code is a bother. Office 2000+ simplifies this task by letting you convert a block of code to comments with a click of a button.

Open any module in the Visual Basic Editor (VBE), and then choose View>Toolbars and choose Edit from the menu bar to display the Edit toolbar.

Select the lines of code that you want to turn into comments. Then, click the Comment Block button on the Edit toolbar (it's the sixth button in from the RIGHT end of the toolbar).
Each line of the selected code is now preceded with an apostrophe.




To convert the comments back to executable code, select the appropriate lines and click the Uncomment Block button, which is immediately to the right of the Comment Block button.
This, of course, works in any application that uses the VBE.

Ross, suggested that two or three apostrophes (sometimes called inverted commas) be placed around existing comments. When the Comment Block is used, the original comments will not be removed.



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<Doug Klippert@ 7:04 AM

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  Friday, March 09, 2007 – Permalink –

Random Slides

Vary the show


Here is the code that can be used to mix up the order of your slides.


 Sub sort_rand()

Dim i As Integer
Dim myvalue As Integer
Dim islides As Integer
islides = ActivePresentation.Slides.Count
For i = 1 To ActivePresentation.Slides.Count
myvalue = Int((i * Rnd) + 1)
ActiveWindow.ViewType = ppViewSlideSorter
ActivePresentation.Slides(myvalue).Select
ActiveWindow.Selection.Cut
ActivePresentation.Slides(islides - 1).Select
ActiveWindow.View.Paste
Next

End Sub



Brian Reilly


PowerPoint Tools:
Randomize the order of a PowerPoint presentation



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<Doug Klippert@ 6:27 AM

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